Tag Archives: Skills

Developing your skill

Recently I was at a presentation where I was talking to the audience and through some light-hearted banter with the audience participants, one of the front row attendees was discussing how they had been in this industry for over 34 years.  This got me really thinking.  Over the 34 years that this person had been in their industry, I was considering how much skill and knowledge that person had built up in their role.  I think this is something we all need to consider as we progress in our chosen careers.  How much time and effort are we putting into developing our skills, knowledge and improving our proposition.  As we enter some industries, we are often pulled into believing that we will continue to just do what we have always done and that will be fine.  

A key component we have to keep considering is how we get better in our role and keep developing the skills to become more and more valuable.

We all know that as technology and new systems enter our workforce, there are always those that will be left behind because they have not continued to keep up.

Please write down the 5 key skills that you have working in your current role and have a think about how you could get even better in these 5 key areas this year.  What training, what education, what mentorship would be of benefit for you to become that one step better in 2019.

It’s Spring… Time To Get Creative

The newbie real estate agent  had just closed his first deal.  To his horror he discovered the piece of land he’d sold was mostly submerged at high tide.  He asked his boss if they should annul the deal, but his boss roared at him, “Money back? What kind of salesman are you? Get out there and sell him a houseboat.”

There’s always a not so obvious answer.  Spring is a great time to get creative… analyse what you’ve done, contrast it with the best in the industry, and figure out how you can be the biggest mover in your marketplace.  Analysis and benchmarking of results are the awesome tools that can make a huge difference.

5 Tips for Professional Business-Writing

Not everyone needs to be an English professor but one sure way to diminish your professionalism in the eyes of your staff, customers or prospects reading what you’ve written is poor business-writing basics. Communication is the single most critical element in engaging people. In an age of text-speak and consulting jargon, one sure way to stand out positively from the crowd and noise is clear, simple, and persuasive written communication skills.

I’ve had several books published, as well as being a regular columnist in industry media. I watch with amazement at professional proofers doing their job. Neither you nor I need to have that level of skill and precision, but we can all improve our results and lessen our regrets by following a few simple principles. I’m not calling them ‘rules’. The thing with English is that every time you have a rule, you soon find many exceptions. I before E anyone?

I met one trainee who ran a clothing boutique. They’d sent out a mailbox drop in their neighbourhood promoting their latest fashion arrivals. Their intention was to communicate that many of the shoes matched up nicely with many of the trousers on offer. They referred to this matching as, “These shoes are complimentary with these pants”. Unfortunately, what they meant was, “These shoes are complementary with these pants”. You see, one of those words means ‘matching’ but the other one means ‘free’.

  1. Write from the reader’s point of view

    Are you including information useful and relevant to the reader or just brain dumping to get it out of your head or make you look like an expert? They don’t have time to read everything and there is a lot of competition for their attention. How often are you using the words “you” and “your” compared to “me”, “my” and “I”?

  2. Ambiguity is the enemy

    I saw a billboard advertising ice cream that was, “97% fat-free and gluten-free”. Can a gluten-intolerant person eat that ice cream? It’s ambiguous. I saw a magazine cover, “Rachel Ray loves cooking her family and her dog”. How do her family and dog feel about this?

  3. If in doubt, leave it out

    If you’re not sure, how can you be sure they’re sure? If you can’t explain to me where and why you might use the word ‘whom’, then don’t use that word.

  4. Less is more

    Do I need to expand this? I hope not.

  5. Purposefulness

    What is the purpose of your document? Is it to sell, influence, or inform? Should that one email be three emails instead? Check all your ideas that you might include back against the over-riding purpose of the document. If it isn’t working for your purpose, it’s working against it. Leave it out or append it.

In jest, I often recommend having a13-year old around of slightly above average intelligence. They can test your writing for reader-centricity, clarity, efficiency and meaning. If you don’t have access to such a resource, have you ever run readability statistics over your documents? You can find this function in your word-processing apps usually in the same menu as spellchecker. Not everyone needs to write for a 13-year old, but the stats can give you a feel for the consistent level you should be writing for and when you’re off-track.

Not every document matters, but if it matters, it really matters. Use fresh eyes and have others check your writing and you reciprocate. If you have multiple people contributing to a single document such as a proposal, then make one person in charge of sorting consistency.

Better engagement via better communication leads to increased productivity and revenue. Let’s write right!

The F-Word(s) in Negotiation

One business owner I met this week was concerned about his team negotiating by phone or email, rather than taking the time to have face-to-face meetings. Under time pressure, there is a huge temptation to pick up the phone or email to progress a deal, but the tradeoff is a loss in 3 key areas of negotiation – feedback, focus and flexibility.

Feedback to a proposal is often communicated  by a person’s body language, and without that feedback we can’t judge the best next step. The focus of a meeting is far better than on the phone or emailing where there are more distractions. And flexibility is needed in a give-and-take negotiation, where both sides try to problem-solve and meet their interests. Emails aren’t flexible, and can be recipes for disaster in a negotiation as they tend to state a fixed position.

So following my own advice, if you want to improve your financial performance by up-skilling your team’s negotiation skills, then let me know (by phone or email) and happy to meet up over a coffee to discuss how I can help.