Tag Archives: Negotiation

The Power of Silence… The biggest secret to successful negotiation

5 ways to increase your authority and negotiation skills.

Do you believe that silence is golden?

Why is it that so many in the sales profession don’t value the art and skill of remaining silent? 

Why do many of us think of silence in a negative fashion?  According to the Washington post… “Silence, it turns out, is one of the mostpowerful weapons an individual can bring to the table.”

FIVE POSITIVE POWERS OF SILENCE

1….. When Negotiating

Silence will give you immense power when negotiating. Most people dislike silence and will replace silence with constant talking. You will be surprised what you can learn from the other party when you are silent. If you practice the skill of remaining silent, you will be amazed by the additional information you receive which may have been kept previously to themselves.

Silence may not be easy, but the results are worth it.  Using silence usually put you in the far more powerful negotiation situation.

2…..When Presenting

when speaking in public, many of us suffer from nerves, and that leads us to speak more quickly than we would normally do. Slow it all down and introduce some silent pauses.

Check out www.jdouglasedwards.com.au….A master of the silent pause.

When presenting, the power of silence can deliver greater credibility when used by the presenter. When delivering a key point, try using silence is a positive tool to bring the audience back to you and also emphasise the key point.

3….. When responding.

Rather than responding to someone’s enquiry or question immediately, the positive power of silence before you respond as greatly to your response. By pausing, you are showing you are thinking about and reflecting on your reply.

Silence always expects a response. When you give people silence to respond, they will give you far better, more thought over responses.

4….. When building trust

In order to build and develop better relationships, trust must be built. One of the best ways to build trust is to actively listen to the other party.

When you are actively listening, you are silent. Maximise the power of silence by making notes and using your head in acknowledgement of what the other person is saying.

Your feedback to them during the conversation will show that are interested in what is being said and the speaker will appreciate that.

This action of active listening will create and build trust.

5….. When listening

Very few of us perform well in the art of listing, particularly active listening. The power of silence plays a big part in you being highly effective in this area. Having silence is your first response will in many people’s eyes make you wise you will see more useful and more intelligent if you can resist the urge to respond immediately when something is said, it will serve you well because you will only give will thought out and more intelligent responses.

QUOTES ON SILENCE

“Nothing strengthens authority so much as silence
Leonardo da Vinci

Silence is a source of great strength
Lao Tzu

Silence is better than one meaning words
Pythagoras

I am rather inclined to silence
Abraham Lincoln

Silence isn’t empty, it’s full of answers
Anonymous

Silence is one of the great art is of communication
Cicero

Silence is sometimes the best answer
Dalai lama

Sometimes it’s best to stay quiet. The silence can speak volumes without ever saying a word
Anonymous

Silence is golden when you can’t think of a good answer
Mohammed Ali

WAYS TO EMBRACE  SILENCE…..FROM C. P. GATTI

UNPLUG

Disconnect your laptop and mobile devices and have an evening of silence.

Spend more time with an inspirational book to bring you insight in the day

NATURE

Enjoy the silence of nature that is around you. Rise early to take a stroll around your neighbourhood

PEACE

Practising silence can bring in a piece to you, to Brit business relationships, and to your world

REFOCUS

When we grab a moment of silence, it gives us a chance to refocus on what is important to you e.g. your family and friends. Additionally learning to be silent will help you become a better listener

DREAM BIG

Dream big by writing down your deepest wishes and thoughts. Right ways of accomplishing these goals in the future

About David Jackson CSP 

David is internationally known as “THE SALES DOCTOR” for his Vitamins for Success and prescriptions for uplifting Profits.  He has over 30 years of experience as an internationally recognised Sales Skills and Communication Coach including Keynote Public Speaker. David brings the ability to positively transform the skills and attitudes of his audiences with humour and real world experiences. He will lift you to a new level.

Negotiation as a habit

True or false - it takes 21 days to form a habit? Sorry, but it’s just not true. The 21-day myth started when the work of a 1960’s plastic surgeon (Dr. Maxwell Maltz) was misquoted, and so it stuck. The reality is it takes much longer, and there are three phases – the honeymoon, the fight through, and finally second nature. In developing negotiation as a habit, we can expect the same phases of getting excited about the benefits, being frustrated when the other side is difficult, and finally where its just the way you do things.

Negotiation normally brings to mind major transactions with customers and suppliers, selling an asset, negotiating a mortgage, or discussing your salary. The reality is that we all negotiate everyday, from what we will have for dinner, to bedtime for children. So if we develop negotiation as a habit in our daily life, its a safe bet to expect that it starts to become the way we approach major home or work negotiations.

Put simply, negotiation is reaching agreement through conversation. While it gets considerably more complicated given the human dimension, the process of negotiation can be summarised as looking at interests rather than positions, separating the person from the problem, considering alternatives (BATNA), taking a problem solving approach, and then trading away what is less important in return for what is important. So next time you are tempted to reach straight for power or authority, take a second to think whether there is a better way to reach agreement by checking your assumptions. Like the 21-day myth, we sometimes get it wrong.